News

Opportunity: Teaching Fellow in International Human Rights Law (Distance-Learning), MA Understanding and Securing Human Rights

Friday 14 July 2017
Contract type: Part-time, self-employed Location: flexible Salary: competitive The campus-based MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, is the longest-running interdisciplinary, practice-based MA in Human Rights in the UK. Established in collaboration with Amnesty International over 20 years ago, we have educated hundreds of human rights professionals working around the world to secure, protect, and advocate for human rights.

Call for papers: Global Decolonization workshop - Concepts and Connections

Thursday 23 March 2017
University of London in Paris (ULIP), PARIS 6-7 JULY 2017 The Global Decolonization Workshop (GDW) is a new collaboration between the School of Advanced Study (University of London) and New York University. It seeks to forge a global forum for knowledge exchange in the interdisciplinary field of decolonization studies.

ICwS Fellow discusses Canada-EU trade relations on BBC Radio

Thursday 16 February 2017
ICwS Senior Research Fellow Dr Annis May Timpson discussed Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's address to the European Parliament and the recently approved free trade agreement between the EU and Canada, and reluctance to ratify it within parts of Europe, more widely on BBC Radio's Good Morning Scotland. You can hear Dr Timpson discuss the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the EU between minutes 40-44.10 on BBC iPlayer .

Institute's Senior Research Fellows' new publications now available

Monday 30 January 2017
The Institute of Commonwealth Studies is delighted to share news of a number of recent publications written by our distinguished Senior Research Fellows. Richard Bourne wrote his book ‘Nigeria: A New History of a Turbulent Century’ while a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute. This work offers a new look at Nigeria, tracing its history from its pre-colonial days to independence and up to the current day, with a particular look at the failure to distribute wealth earned from the country’s rich oil, mineral and agricultural resources.

New resources added to the Commonwealth Oral History Project Website

Friday 6 January 2017
The inagural Anthony Low lecture, delivered by the Hon Gareth Evans, former Foreign Minister of Australia, at the Australian National University, is available via the Commonwealth Oral History Project website . You can read the interviews by Dr Sue Onslow with Gareth Evans, undertaken as part of the project,  here .

SAS academics edit new Routledge Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

Monday 12 September 2016
The new Handbook of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights is edited by Dr Damien Short (Director of the Human Rights Consortium) and Dr Corinne Lennox (Associate Director of the Human Rights Consortium and ICWS Senior Lecturer in Human Rights). Numerous other academics from the School of Advanced Study have contributed to this volume, including Professor Paul Havemann (ICWS Senior Research Fellow), Dr Julian Burger (ICWS Lecturer in Human Rights in Latin America), Professor Rachel Sieder (ILAS Associate Fellow) and Dr Maria Sapignoli (former ICWS Fellow).

ICWS academics discuss the future of the UK-Commonwealth relationship after Brexit

Friday 26 August 2016
Dr Sue Onslow, Senior Lecturer in Commonwealth Studies at ICWS, features in BBC Radio 4’s programme What’s the point of…The Commonwealth, alongside Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland and former ambassador to South African Abdul Minty. Dr Onslow explained that the 53-member organisation is a unique self-help support society with a very small bureaucracy – the complete antithesis of the EU. What’s the point of…The Commonwealth is available via the BBC iPlayer .

ICWS Senior Research Fellow’s new publication sheds light on a tightly-guarded secret of the Second World War

Friday 12 August 2016
Dr Susan Williams’ (ICWS Senior Research Fellow) new book Spies in the Congo: The Race for the Ore that Built the Atomic Bomb (Hurst, 2016)  sheds light on the race for control of the strategically significant Shinkolobwe uranium mine in the then-Belgian Congo, vital to the success of the Manhattan Project and the role of Washington’s elite secret intelligence agents tasked to prevent uranium in the Congo being diverted to Germany, which was also developing an atomic bomb at the time.

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